Science News – July 9th, 2016

Science News! Let’s take a look at some of the important developments in science this week…

First, this week NASA’s Juno spacecraft reached Jupiter after a five year journey and is now orbiting the gas giant. The mission will collect in depth data about Jupiter that will help us to understand how the planet formed. Read more from Popular Science here.

Second, this week China finished constructing the world’s largest radio telescope. With a dish the size of 30 football fields the telescope will search for signs of intelligent life in space and can help us learn more about the early days of the universe. Read more from Scientific American here.

Third, researches have discovered evidence of neanderthal cannibalism in northern Europe. Bones were found with signs of having been cut and broken to extract marrow. Read more from Phys.org here.

Those are just a few of the exciting things going on in the world of science this week. Have you heard about any other interesting science news lately? Leave a comment and let us know!

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Science News – June 17th, 2016

Science News! Let’s take a look at some of the important developments in science this week…

First, gravitational waves have been detected a second time by an international team of physicists and astronomers. These type of waves were predicted to exist by Einstein’s general theory of relativity but it was thought they were too weak to ever be measured. As with the first detection these waves were caused by the tight orbit of two black holes. Read more from Phys.org here.

Second, the level of CO2 in the atmosphere in Antarctica has reached 400 parts per million for the first time in 4 million years. This means that even remote regions are catching up with the increasing CO2 levels of more populated areas. Read more from Scientific American here.

Third, a study has found 15 reefs among 2,500 studied across the world that are not dying as quickly as predicted. These spots show some similarities in how they are being managed and conserved that could help shed light on how to manage other reefs that are not fairing as well. Read more from NPR here.

Those are just a few of the exciting things going on in the world of science this week. Have you heard about any other interesting science news lately? Leave a comment and let us know!

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Science News – May 27th, 2016

Science News! Let’s take a look at some of the important developments in science this week…

First, scientists entered the Bruniquel Cave in southern France, which had been sealed off for thousands of years, and found mysterious semicircles of stalagmites and evidence of fires that had been created by Neanderthals. Uranium dating shows the rings were stacked up 175,000 years ago, which makes them among the oldest structures created by our human relatives ever found. What the purpose of the structures was is still a mystery. Do you have a theory? Read more from the Smithsonian here.

Second, astronomers using the world’s most powerful telescope and a gravitational lensing technique were able to detect the faintest galaxy of the early universe yet found. The galaxy was born just after the Big Bang and appears to us as it was 13 Billion years ago. Read more from Phys.org here.

Third, the American military has reported the first instance of a bacteria resistant to colistin, a drug considered the last resort in killing superbugs. Although resistant to this last resort drug, the bacteria in this case was luckily not resistant to a class of drugs called carbapenems, and the patient who was carrying the bacteria is now well. However, if bacteria that are resistant to carbapenems are also able to acquire the resistance to colistin they may be unstoppable. Read more from the New York Times here.

Those are just a few of the exciting things going on in the world of science this week. Have you heard about any other interesting science news lately? Leave a comment and let us know!

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Science News – January 30th, 2016

Science News! Let’s take a look at some of the important developments in science this week…

First, scientists have discovered that Antarctic fungi can survive conditions similar to those on Mars. Fungi gathered from Antarctic rocks were taken aboard the International Space Station and after 18 months of being exposed to atmospheric conditions, pressure, and UV radiation similar to that of Mars, more than 60% of the fungal cells had survived with high DNA stability. Read more from Phys.org here.

Second, scientists have found a planet that is orbiting 600 Billion miles from its host star, 175 times farther than Pluto is from our sun. This makes the solar system in which the planet orbits the largest yet found. The planet is a gas giant, about 12 to 15 times the size of Jupiter, and was previously thought to be a rogue planet orbiting freely through space. Read more from Scientific American here.

Third, scientists have experimented with mice and found that a mouse can be male without having a Y chromosome. By manipulating genes on the X chromosome and another chromosome the scientists were able to create mice without a Y chromosome that produced immature sperm. When this immature sperm was artificially placed into a female mouse, offspring were successfully produced. This seems to show that the Y chromosome is not an absolutely necessary aspect of maleness. Read more from Science News.org here.

Those are just a few of the exciting things going on in the world of science this week. Have you heard about any other interesting science news lately? Leave a comment and let us know!

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